Tasting Note: 2016 Domaine Faiveley Mercurey Blanc Clos Rochette

Recently, I was able to attend a tasting of Domaine Faiveley wines presented by Jerome Flous, the chief winemaker of the domaine. It was a riveting lesson in terroir, but perhaps more importantly, it was an amazing opportunity to learn about what the real essence of Burgundy winemaking is. As Jerome explained, it is a snapshot that captures the conditions of a vintage – whether that is perfect weather, or debilitating frost, Burgundy winemaking is about creating a time capsule of a year. One way to capture that picture in a vintage is through a monopole bottling.

2016 was a difficult vintage in Burgundy. It began with a mild winter, but some producers lost over half their fruit to spring frosts. That was followed by threats of mildew and wet conditions through the end of the spring. However, the conditions from July through September were largely ideal and producers were able to achieve quality levels of acidity in their wines. The 2016 monopole is able to capture that acidity and ripeness, while also remaining fresh.

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Jerome Flous, Chief Winemaker of Domaine Faiveley

2016 Domaine Faiveley Mercurey Blanc Clos Rochette This comes from a little over 4 hectares of clay, limestone and rocky soils in Mercurey, and from vines that are up to nearly 60 years old. A portion of the wine is aged in oak, while the majority matures in stainless steel. The nose was full of lemon zest, white flowers and hints of green grass. On the palate, I found an excellent pop of acid, with a clean and medium length finish. Overall, this was a lovely, fresh expression of chardonnay. Recommend

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